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Saturday, October 27, 2007

Rejuvenate & Renew


THE GEISER GRAND HOTEL IN BAKER CITY, OREGON

Above is a great hotel. Excellent for a mini-vacation. Which I've just returned from having, and having a great time. Now I'm rejuvenated and renewed. Meaning:

1. My thoughts, ideas and enthusiasm for my new w.i.p. is increased.
2. I'm more effective in my "day jobs" and complete those tasks more quickly.
3. My energy is up and much clearer.

All this from taking a couple of days off.

So, as another creative person, what do you do to rejuvenate and renew?


15 comments:

Beth said...

I LOVE Baker City! Stumbled across it last winter, and now I always stop for a latte at Mad Matilda's if I'm in the vicinity (which means, in Oregon). Glad you got away. A break from the routine definitely rejuvenates. As does spending time in nature, for me. I'll be in Key West for a few days this week, seeking juvenation myself. :-)

Conda said...

Mad Matilda's! Great breakfasts, too!

Beth said...

I'll have to remember that for next time...now I want an espresso! :-( Not much good coffee in SW Florida...

Conda said...

Yikes! No good coffee? My s.o. would never survive...(I'm primarily a tea drinker.)

Beth said...

It's 13 miles to Starbucks and Panera. Luckily I don't do caffeine, but I love the experience of a good latte. I'm continually baffled that people in other parts of the country haven't figured out how convenient it is to drive through and grab a mocha...but they think we're weird for paying $3 for a coffee, too! :-)

Kathy McIntosh said...

Baker City's on my list, too. I've been through but I want to spend a night at the Geiser Grand.
The question is...did you see the ghost? :)

Conda said...

There's a few ghosts at the Geiser Grand--a blue Gibson Girl and several "flappers" in full flapper regalia. We saw the "evidence" of the flappers in the form of part of a peacock feather on the stairs where they are known to "float." Great fun!

Beth said...

Oh that's great, Conda!! I have ghosts in the book I'm working on right now - never thought about having them leave traces. How very cool. Thanks for the idea - and I need to add that hotel to my BC to-do list once I get back home.

Conda said...

Ohh, how cool, my visit to the Geiser Grand has inspired your writing Beth! I look forward to reading your finished w.i.p. and catching the inspiration!

Nancy P said...

What a great looking hotel! I've never even heard of Baker City before, so I'll google it and wish I were there.

Conda said...

It's truly a Old West mining town, Nancy. And a few miles from Baker City is the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, which is fascinating. Especially for somebody like me, whose family came out on the trail, aka the longest cemetery in the world.

Beth said...

Your family came out on the trail? I am so impressed, Conda. A true native. I STILL haven't seen the ruts, though I keep wandering off the highway when I see signs. One of these days I will.

That's really amazing. I hope you have family history, stories, etc. about some of that.

Conda said...

The ruts are amazing, incredibly deep in some spots. And yes, I have stories and family history, not as much as I would like. My great-great grandfather who came out hated the trail (with good reason) and didn't speak of it much.

Beth said...

I guess you can't blame him, but what a shame to lose that oral history. We have a man in Coeur d'Alene, Ace Walden, 100 years old. His father walked from MN to OR when he was 18, then back to CDA to settle. Talk about a piece of history. Treasure what you do have - and I'll look for those ruts next time I'm in OR.

Conda said...

Fascinating and almost unbelievable what those old pioneers did. The great-great grandfather I mentioned before had to make the trip TWICE, first time he let the wagon train go on while he stayed with his pregnant bride. Both her and the baby died (longest cemetery in the world) and he had to go back east.

My other great-great grandfather got all the way to Portland, Oregon and then doubled back to Star, Idaho.

They walked the whole 2000 miles, mostly barefoot. If this was fiction, nobody would believe it.

People are amazing!